Nascar Explained – How does Nascar work exactly?

If you’re just a casual Nascar watcher, then you might not know exactly how it works – you just know you like watching the cars go around the track.

If you’re just a casual Nascar watcher, then you might not know exactly how it works – you just know you like watching the cars go around the track. Well, if you’re looking to change things up for next season, then we’ve got a few pointers for you, and we’re going to do our best to explain the rules. Who knows, it might help you to place your next bet.

The Rules in Nascar 2017

At the most basic level, there are three segments per race, with each segment being referred to as a ‘stage. Something important to note is that stage lengths differ depending on the track, so make sure you check Nascar’s official website for more information on that. One of the biggest questions that people have when it comes to Nascar, is why it doesn’t seem to matter if a driver wins or loses. It is arguably better to win a race, but the top-10 drivers throughout each race will actually accumulate points in each stage, and these points will count toward the championships. The system works, as follows:

  • Winner – 40 Points
  • Second Place – 35 Points

The points accumulated for each car afterward will be reduced by one, until finally, it hits one point, after which every driver in each position will be awarded a single point. So you see, depending on the number of points accumulated, even the last place car can progress to the championships.

Repairs and Pit Stops

A major change in 2017 is the allowance for repairs. As of right now, teams are on a five minute clock for initial repairs, and they only need to ensure that the car can do the minimum speed for the track that they are on. That said, if a car has to go into the garage, it will not be returning for that race. In other words, you won’t be seeing a comeback at the tail end of the race, as epic as that would be. Also remember that drivers are no longer allowed to replace side panels during the race, meaning a serious wreck will put them out of commission. These are just the core basics of Nascar, and you can already see that they are slightly more complex than most people would lead you to believe. In other words, it’s much bigger than ‘left turns’. Some of the rule changes have promoted safety, especially the repair rules, which ensure that only properly suited cars are allowed on the track. While this might cut down on the epic crashes, it will also serve to save lives. Remember – just because your player doesn’t win the race, doesn’t mean they’re not going to the championships.

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